How To Help Children With SPD In The Classroom

Sensory Processing Disorder can make it difficult for children to be successful in school. The behaviors that are presented as a result of SPD can impact their ability to complete activities with their peers.


How to Help Children with SPD Focus

Make sure your children know how to ask for the help that they need during class. I have taught children to use a hand signal that tells the teacher they require a sensory break. They would go right outside the classroom and do wall push-ups, jumping jacks, go to the bathroom, wash their face then come back to the classroom. This is just one example of how to help improve a child's function in the classroom.


Others have fidget boxes, a band around the bottom of their chair that provides them with sensory feedback. Others have had chewlery or fidget toys on their desks. Having your child aware of their needs and being able to express them to the teacher is crucial for them. This will help them feel confident and that they are able to get what they need to be successful in the classroom.


Communicate With Their Teacher

Having your teacher understand how your child is impacted by their SPD will allow them to better handle the situation. For example, if your child is unable to sit still, frequent sensory breaks are great to help them get their energy out while providing a calming effect. If they see your child becoming overwhelmed, they can implement techniques learned prior to a meltdown. Allowing your child to have fidgets or a cushion on their chair to help them improve their attention. Make sure the child's chair is the correct height and they are sitting in a spot where they are close to the teacher away from distractions.


Communication with your child's teacher is important for your child to feel safe and secure in the classroom. By having your child's teacher better understand the causes and how to handle your child's SPD issues, they will build a positive rapport and have a successful year.


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